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Project ABLE is a statewide coalition of AIDS service providers, advocates and people with HIV/AIDS. Since the early 1990’s, Project ABLE has successfully increased state funding for HIV/AIDS by working effectively with several governors and their respective administrations, the Massachusetts legislature, and through mobilizing a grassroots network of HIV/AIDS service providers, advocates, and people with HIV/AIDS.

Please join us for GETTING TO ZERO in Massachusetts,

Project ABLE’s Advocacy Day at the State House

Advocate for HIV/AIDS/HCV funding on Friday, April 14, 2016 at the Grand Staircase in the State House, Boston.

There will be speeches, a continental breakfast, and time to visit your legislators!

10:00-10:30 Registration
10:30-11:30 Program
11:30-1:00 Legislative Visits

Click here for the April 14 Advocacy Day Flyer.

Project ABLE Fact Sheet – Fiscal Year 2018

Please Fund the HIV/AIDS/Hepatitis C Line Item (4512-0103) at $35 M for FY 2018!

Project ABLE requests the HIV/AIDS/HCV Line Item (4512-0103) is funded at $35M in FY18 to prevent new infections, improve health outcomes, and save money and lives. Recent budget cuts threaten the progress Massachusetts has made to curtail the HIV/AIDS/HCV epidemic. Restoration of funding is needed for the following areas:

        1) HIV/AIDS Support Services. Increased funding for case management for the                    growing population of people living with HIV to keep people living independently in              their homes and reduce transmission of the virus.

         2) HCV Prevention, Screening, and Health Navigation. Increased funding for                      health navigation to cure readiness and reducing the spread of new infections                      through education, outreach, and syringe exchange.

         3) HIV Prevention. Increased funding for HIV prevention work including education                  and outreach on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis              (PEP), and syringe exchange.

We have more tools and opportunities than ever before to continue this progress, including Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis to prevent new HIV infections, new medications that can cure HCV, and syringe access programs to engage injection drug users in care and reduce the transmission of infectious diseases.

The opioid epidemic also presents a significant threat to the progress we have made. While HIV infections attributed to injection drug use have dropped by 92% in Massachusetts in the past ten years, injection drug use still accounted for 7% of new HIV infections between 2011 and 2013 and it is likely this number will continue to rise.

Nearly 21,000 people are living with HIV and an estimated 2000,000 people are infected with HCV in Massachusetts. Thousands more are unaware they are infected with these viruses. There continue to be significant health disparities. African-Americans and Hispanics are impacted disproportionately by significantly higher rates of HIV.

In December, the Getting to Zero Coalition, which includes Project ABLE, released the “Massachusetts Comprehensive Plan to Eliminate HIV Discrimination, AIDS Related Deaths, and New HIV Infections” http://www.gettingtozeroma.org/. None of the goals outlined in the report are possible without restoration of funding to the HIV/AIDS/HCV Line Item.

Getting to ZERO infections in Massachusetts is possible with investment in programs that work!

For more information, contact at HIVProjectABLE@aol.com or call 617.797.8488